Mishpatim – Breaking the Law

Mishpatim – Breaking the Law

Mishpatim is about civil and criminal law. Most societies promulgate laws for governing law and order. These are abided by through the concept of a social contract. Torah law is beyond contract, and therefore cannot be rationalised out of existence. It is in sync with the template of creation. Notes: • Our Parsha, Mishpatim, discusses

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Mishpatim – Why Have Law?

Mishpatim – Why Have Law?

Different writers have offered various rationales for society legislating laws. The general view is that they conform to human reason (though reason is variable). In Judaism law is an expression of G-d’s intention and will, thereby even the most reasonable of laws have higher meaning. Many a jurisprudential writer has argued the basis of the

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Mishpatim – Even Common-Sense Needs G-d’s Imprimatur

Mishpatim – Even Common-Sense Needs G-d’s Imprimatur

he definition of something as simple as the word, ‘law’, defies writers of jurisprudence, philosophy, and religion combined. And yet, our Parsha is named Mishpatim – ‘laws’.Interestingly in Hebrew the word for judge ‘Shofet’and for law ‘Mishpatim’ are the same root, indicating that the judge must be of the ‘same stuff’ as the law he

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Mishpatim – Running the Red Light

Mishpatim – Running the Red Light

This week’s Parsha, Mishpatim, raises a curiosity. It describes the basic civil and criminal laws that regulate society and legal recourse in cases of civil and criminal disobedience. It then goes on to describe the design of the Mishkan – the construction of the portal between this world and the higher spiritual realms. It is

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Mishpatim – V’Eyleh Mishpotim Osher Tossim Leifneichem

Mishpatim – V’Eyleh Mishpotim Osher Tossim Leifneichem

Mishpoim means laws. But there are three kinds of laws. Firstly the laws that are inscrutable, without human capacity to fathom their logic – these are the Chukkim — of which I Judaism there are very few, a mere handful, like Mikva and Kashrut. Secondly there are the laws that once understood are perfectly reasonable

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